John Hardtman

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Work-for-Hire Agreement

Look in the mirror, Jones. I have been a design professional for 15 years and have only ever been asked to sign one - which I did not sign because I'm a knowledgeable, self-respecting professional. You need to educate yourself on the law regarding work for hire which, in simple terms, is basically someone who is an employee or acting as an employee of the client - usually working on site, under direct supervision, with little or no creative input. As an example, a contract designer working for an ad agency as a production artist would sign a work for hire agreement. Original design work, as in creating original intellectual property for a client is not work for hire and is highly protected by copyright laws. So, Tony Apt is completely right about a professional artist leaving the table. Sounds like you're the stoned artist, Leachman, and a troll. Hard as it may be, try to be more respectful.

Posted 1 year ago 

Work-for-Hire Agreement

I'm not sure what your point is with your comment. But if you're going to assert statements as facts, you should get the facts right. Nike's "swoosh" logo was designed in 1971 by Carolyn Davidson, a Portland State University student. She knowingly agreed to the terms of a startup company, then called Blue Ribbon Sports, selling shoes out of the back of a car. BRS was not the multi-billion dollar global conglomerate now known as Nike. In addition to the $35 fee, Davidson received a significant bonus payment (I believe $30,000) and a diamond swoosh ring after the company went public in 1983. So if your point was something to the effect that she was ripped off, I don't believe she thinks so. In fact, she has publicly stated that she was surprised to receive the extra compensation, accepting that the fee she received originally was what she agreed to and had no expectation of anything more.

Posted 1 year ago